Anxiety

Anxiety

People suffering from anxiety disorders often face more than a few minutes or hours of uncomfortable anxiety. Their anxiety goes on for longer periods of time – months on ends – and they can be so severe that they can be triggered by harmless situations, interfere with one’s social relationships, academic performance and work performance, and even result in comorbid mental health illnesses like depression. Understand what is and how we can treat anxiety.

Linkin Park

RIP Chester Bennington

I didn’t want to wake up. I was having a much better time asleep. And that’s really sad. It was almost like a reverse nightmare, like when you wake up from a nightmare you’re so relieved. I woke up into a nightmare. ― Ned Vizzini, It’s Kind of a Funny Story

Caring for Mentally Ill

[Repost] How to support a depressed partner while maintaining your own mental health

Remember that depression isn’t just a mental illness – It used to drive me mad that Rob wouldn’t get out of bed. It took a while to realise that he “couldn’t” rather than “wouldn’t”. I was so sure he would feel better if he came out for a walk or met his friends, but depression is a physical illness, too. As Dr Cain says: “Physically, depression impacts energy levels. People sometimes feel very tired and want to stay in bed all the time.”

Maona

[Repost] What Moana Taught Me About Trauma

I am currently wading through the thick muck and mire of recovery from childhood sexual abuse, and sometimes it gets ugly. My therapist says that I “check out” as a defense mechanism – that I numb myself by disassociating from the trauma. And I do. Because I’m terrified to feel my feelings. I’m terrified that if I really let them out, I will be crushed by them. I’m getting there, slowly, one painful step at a time. But I’m getting there.

The Shock of the Fall

Reflections: Extract from ‘The Shock of the Fall’ by Nathan Filer

What struck me in the above extract was Mattew’s sense of powerlessness and lack of control over his relapse, recovery and treatment journey in the health and family system. We want every individual in Singapore to have a safe space to reach out and tell his/her story. To have one’s emotions and experiences held tight. We want to create a community that validates not only the joy and triumphs of life, but also the pain and secret shames embedded in your personal journeys.

Gambling

Gambling May Bring You And Your Family Great Suffering

Many of us have gambled before, but some of us can control it, whereas there are some who cannot control it. Therefore, it becomes an addiction. Addiction to gambling is very, very, extremely difficult to cure. Many people, when they get hooked, cannot quit the addiction. Many of these gamblers carry on the gambling lifestyle even until their death! This means that in their life, most of the time is all about gambling. Even most of their hard earned money goes to gambling. 

Hmm...

Calling For Writers

Hi readers! We’re looking for people to write about mental health on this site. It can be a one-time thing, so don’t worry about commitment. You don’t need to have experience with mental illness to write or professional writing experience. Do leave us a message or comment with your contact details if you’re interested. Thank you (:

Inside Out

Emotion Regulation in ST and DBT

The article explores ways in which both Schema Therapy (Jeffery Young) and Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (Marshall Linehan) target emotion dysregulation present in Borderline Personality Disorder and other forms of psychopathology. Useful for informing therapy and treatment based decisions.

Mirror Maze

The Mirror Maze – A honestly frightening encounter for me

When we entered the mirror maze, it felt like a psychedelic drug-fuelled acid trip, which wasn’t a good thing, in my mind. We had to use our pool noodles to help us feel our way through the mirror maze, as we might knock into the mirrors accidentally. There were many dead-ends and your own reflection would stare back at you from multiple mirrors.

Matchsticks at IMH

Matchsticks of IMH

The name Matchsticks embodies the sense of hope that we aspire to be for the mental health community. We hope to ignite the passion to serve the mental health community in others, in order to spark a difference as we move toward being a more inclusive society. Established in 2014, Matchsticks of IMH has grown into a group of 150 strong youths and working adults. We devote our time weekly in serving the needs of our special friends at the long stay wards in the Institute of Mental Health (IMH).