Friend

How friends help my depression

Social insufficiencies can cause serious mental health issues. We, as humans, are social creatures and need to interact with others. We yearn to have relationships with others, communications with others, support systems, being part of our community, feeling loved by others. But friends who have never experienced mental health issues find it hard to help and can turn out to have certain negative side effects.


 

 

 

Where Am I Heading?

Downhill. I’m going downhill. This is the perfect time for intervention and some form of treatment but unfortunately, like most patients with mental illnesses, don’t know what treatment actually works for them, besides the medicine that they take and the psychologist that they visit once a month. Standing on a slippery slope downhill can only be saved by a friend reaching out their hand with genuine intentions to help, right? Right?

 

Right? Please? Nope.

Whenever I’m on my slippery slope downhill, I try my best to reach out to friends. (Or people in general) I tell them about the problems that I face at the current time: be it hallucinations, feelings of anxiety, depression or suicidal thoughts. I tell them about how I feel, the thoughts going through my head and what I want to do at that moment.

I want to be presented with sympathetic thoughts about how I do not deserve to go through what I am going through. I want to be assured that everything is going to be okay. I want to be assured that I am not as alone as I think I am. I want to be assured that I have somebody to fall back on in case I act rashly.

 

But no, I am typically presented with how I should try to improve on my life and how I need to make a positive change in my life in order to not feel those feelings. And that sucks. While in a bad spot, I don’t want to be told that I haven’t been trying hard enough to not feel how I feel.

But it makes sense. People who do not suffer from mental illnesses don’t feel what I feel. To them, I shouldn’t be feeling what I am feeling. It is not normal, and I believe that is the sad fact that makes mentally ill people who feel alone, feel more alone.

Fuck my life, right?


References, Links & Sources

  • Taylor, Carol. Fundamentals of Nursing: The Art and Science of Person-centered Nursing Care. 8th ed. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer, 2015. Print.


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