Caring for Mentally Ill

[Repost] How to support a depressed partner while maintaining your own mental health

Remember that depression isn’t just a mental illness – It used to drive me mad that Rob wouldn’t get out of bed. It took a while to realise that he “couldn’t” rather than “wouldn’t”. I was so sure he would feel better if he came out for a walk or met his friends, but depression is a physical illness, too. As Dr Cain says: “Physically, depression impacts energy levels. People sometimes feel very tired and want to stay in bed all the time.”

Mum & Child

Mental illness and my mum

Leaving the ward, two things I realised I’d newly acquired were A. a hypothetical diagnosis and B. my mum’s grief/mistrust towards me. The first hit me right off the bat, and would continue to do so as therapy progressed and more issues came to the surface. Medications helped stabilise the highs and lows \, but writing in to the Dependant Protector Scheme for insurance coverage very surely did not.

Shoes

Walking Away From Someone With Mental Illness

Do note that this post is directed towards friends of those with mental illness; not caregivers. Sometimes we have to take a step back when a relationship is too harmful. This is an unavailable option for a lot of caregivers but, when it comes to other relationships, walking away is sometimes the best option.

Questions

Coping with coping

Writing a post on coping strategies does strike me as coming full circle. I started my mental health journey relying very much on distractions and healthy coping methods, such as studying, running, and prayer. While they were crucial to my remaining functional at home and school for a long, long time (no complaints there!), I continued to struggle badly with disconcerting mood swings in private. Eventually, as is prone to happen to even the most stoic of us (much less me), I exhausted my inner resources and turned to not-so-healthy ways of coping.